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Shyamalan's 'Glass' is Engaging Almost Until the End

MOVIE REVIEW
I don’t think anyone will deny that M. Night Shyamalan is a great storyteller. He initially proved that with the release of The Sixth Sense. The symbolism of the color red, the odd scenes that made very little sense until the end of the movie and of course, the amazing twist that nobody saw coming. That incredible twist has almost been the director’s undoing. Since 1999, not one of his other movie’s endings have had the same impact, but he continues to try.

In 2000, Mr. Shyamalan hoped that lightening would strike twice with Unbreakable which also starred Bruce Willis. Like The Sixth Sense, Unbreakable was a mystery only this time, the story featured the lone survivor of a train crash who left the accident without a scratch on him and an incredibly fragile, wheelchair-bound, comic book enthusiast which appeared to be the polar opposite. The story was intriguing, but basically fell apart near the end when the twist was revealed. Now almost 19 years later, the same thing ha…

This Day in Pop Culture for November 5

The Incredibles was released in theaters on Nov. 5, 2005
(Disney/Wikimedia)
‘The Incredibles’ Arrive to Save the Day
It was on this day in 2005 when Disney/Pixar released the animated hit movie, The Incredibles. The family of superheroes included Mr. Incredible (who is super strong), Mrs. Incredible (whose maiden name was Elastigirl), daughter Violet (who can become invisible and create protective force-fields), son Dash (who is super fast) and baby Jack Jack (who the family thought had no superpowers, but it turns out, they were wrong.) The family the fights crime together, stays together. The Incredibles was directed by Brad Bird and won the 2004 Annie Award for Best Animated Feature as well as two Oscars. Although fans requested a sequel for years, Incredibles 2 did not arrive in theaters until June 15, 2018, which also did "super" in the box office.

A huge writers strike happened in Hollywood on Nov. 5, 2007.
(Wikimedia)
Hollywood Goes on Strike
On this day in 2007, film, TV and radio writers went on strike after negotiations break down with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP). Lasting until February 26, 2008, the strike shut down production on more than 60 TV shows. Not surprisingly, the strike is said to have caused a loss of $3 billion to the local Los Angeles economy. TV stations were forced to air reruns over and over again. Some audience even learned how to read a book again.


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