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'Instant Family' Will Pull Your Heartstrings in a Good Way

MOVIE REVIEW
What started as an older man’s joke about wanting to adopt a five-year-old instead of starting from scratch, Instant Family was inspired by writer and director Sean Anders’ real-life family. Pete (Mark Wahlberg) “accidentally” makes the joke to his wife Ellie (Rose Byrne) not wanting to be become that “old dad” everyone knows and before you know it, the two are traveling down to road toward foster care adoptions. After numerous classes taught by two caseworkers (Octavia Spencer and Tig Notaro), the two meet three kids at a “foster fair” gathering. Lizzy (Isabela Moner) is the 15-year-old older sister who has protectively looked after her younger siblings Juan (Gustavo Quiroz) and Lita (Julianna Gamiz) while their mother has been incarcerated. She’s a tough cookie with trust issues. Juan is both accident prone and highly sensitive and Lita is super sweet as long as she gets to eat potato chips at every meal. Almost overnight they become an “instant family” and everything g…

This Day in Pop Culture for November 5

The Incredibles was released in theaters on Nov. 5, 2005
(Disney/Wikimedia)
‘The Incredibles’ Arrive to Save the Day
It was on this day in 2005 when Disney/Pixar released the animated hit movie, The Incredibles. The family of superheroes included Mr. Incredible (who is super strong), Mrs. Incredible (whose maiden name was Elastigirl), daughter Violet (who can become invisible and create protective force-fields), son Dash (who is super fast) and baby Jack Jack (who the family thought had no superpowers, but it turns out, they were wrong.) The family the fights crime together, stays together. The Incredibles was directed by Brad Bird and won the 2004 Annie Award for Best Animated Feature as well as two Oscars. Although fans requested a sequel for years, Incredibles 2 did not arrive in theaters until June 15, 2018, which also did "super" in the box office.

A huge writers strike happened in Hollywood on Nov. 5, 2007.
(Wikimedia)
Hollywood Goes on Strike
On this day in 2007, film, TV and radio writers went on strike after negotiations break down with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP). Lasting until February 26, 2008, the strike shut down production on more than 60 TV shows. Not surprisingly, the strike is said to have caused a loss of $3 billion to the local Los Angeles economy. TV stations were forced to air reruns over and over again. Some audience even learned how to read a book again.


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