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Shyamalan's 'Glass' is Engaging Almost Until the End

MOVIE REVIEW
I don’t think anyone will deny that M. Night Shyamalan is a great storyteller. He initially proved that with the release of The Sixth Sense. The symbolism of the color red, the odd scenes that made very little sense until the end of the movie and of course, the amazing twist that nobody saw coming. That incredible twist has almost been the director’s undoing. Since 1999, not one of his other movie’s endings have had the same impact, but he continues to try.

In 2000, Mr. Shyamalan hoped that lightening would strike twice with Unbreakable which also starred Bruce Willis. Like The Sixth Sense, Unbreakable was a mystery only this time, the story featured the lone survivor of a train crash who left the accident without a scratch on him and an incredibly fragile, wheelchair-bound, comic book enthusiast which appeared to be the polar opposite. The story was intriguing, but basically fell apart near the end when the twist was revealed. Now almost 19 years later, the same thing ha…

This Day in Pop Culture for August 17

(Wikimedia/MGM)

‘The Time Machine’ Opens in Theaters
Based on H.G. Well’s book of the same name, The Time Machine was released in movie theaters on this day in 1960. The time traveling science fiction film was made by MGM and was produced and directed by George Pal who also directed the 1953 version of Wells’ The War of the Worlds. The movie starred Rod Taylor, Yvette Mimieux, Alan Young, David Duncan, Whit Bissell and Sebastian Cabot. The film was a huge hit earning the studio $1,610,000 in the U.S. and Canada and $1 million more from everywhere else. The movie received an Oscar for the time-lapse photography elements. Pal had intended on making a sequel to the movie, but died before he could. However, in 1993, a combination sequel/documentary short titled Time Machine: The Journey Back, featured a scene where Duncan, Taylor, Young and Bissel reprised their roles from the original film. In 2017, ABC debuted the short-lived TV series, Time After Time, that featured H.G. Wells as a time traveler chasing Jack the Ripper.


(Wikimedia)
Pike Place Market Opens in Seattle
Opened on this day in 1907, Seattle’s Pike Place Market is one of the oldest continuously operated public farmers’ markets in the U.S. Built on the edge of a steep hill, the market consists of many levels of shops. The top level is famous for its fresh produce and fishmongers who literally thrown fish to each other in front of their guests. It is estimated that about 500 people live in the market space and the place receives about 10 million visitors annually.



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