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Jordan Peele's 'Us' is a Creepy Tale That Sadly Mirrors Our Reality

MOVIE REVIEW
On May 25, 1986, approximately 6.5 million Americans stood hand in hand forming a human chain that stretched from New York to California for an event called Hands Across America. It was a fundraiser project from USA for Africa (the same people who produced the “We Are the World” single the year before) in hopes of raising $100 million to fight hunger and homelessness. The hope was that everyone who participated would donate $10 for the cause. Families stood and sang together for 15 minutes. And then it was over.

I had trouble remembering if Hands Across America really happened or if it was a gimmick for the film when the original commercial for the event flashed on the big screen during the opening of Us. I only vaguely remember the event, which might have to do more with the fact that I have lived in Washington State my whole life and we weren’t involved in the project. I doubt that I’m the only one and I suspect that was also some of Jordan Peele’s reasoning as well whe…

This Day in Pop Culture for August 15

(Derek Redmond and Paul Campbell/Wikimedia) 
Woodstock is Held
Though expecting “no more than 50,000 people, about 400,000 people attended the Woodstock Music & Art Fair which began on this day in 1969. After numerous changes in venues, Woodstock finally landed at Max Yasgur's 600 acre dairy farm in Bethel, New York. Local townspoeple were unhappy about the concert and posted “Buy No Milk. Stop Max’s Hippy Music Festival.” Due to recent rains, the grounds were muddy, food supplies where great and the sanitation was poor. Newspaper headlines read, “Hippied Mired in a Sea of Mud.” Despite the conditions, it is reported that the festival was reasonable peaceful, but two deaths occurred (one from a heroin overdose and accident involving a tractor and an attendee sleeping in hay field nearby), two births and four miscarriages. Roy Rogers was asked to sing “Happy Trails” at the end of the festival, but he declined.

(Wikimedia/MGM)
‘The Wizard of Oz’ Premieres in Hollywood
One of America’s most beloved movies, The Wizard of Oz, premiered at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre in Hollywood on this day in 1939. The film opened nationally on August 25, 1939. Despite the popularity of the film today, at the time, the movie initially recorded a loss of $1,145,000 for the studio. MGM, the studio behind the film, did not see a profit on the film until it was re-released in 1949. The film has been recognized by the American Film Institute (AFI) numerous times. Oz has been placed as the #6 best movie of all time, #4 for worst villain, and #1 for best song.


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