FEATURED POST

'Instant Family' Will Pull Your Heartstrings in a Good Way

MOVIE REVIEW
What started as an older man’s joke about wanting to adopt a five-year-old instead of starting from scratch, Instant Family was inspired by writer and director Sean Anders’ real-life family. Pete (Mark Wahlberg) “accidentally” makes the joke to his wife Ellie (Rose Byrne) not wanting to be become that “old dad” everyone knows and before you know it, the two are traveling down to road toward foster care adoptions. After numerous classes taught by two caseworkers (Octavia Spencer and Tig Notaro), the two meet three kids at a “foster fair” gathering. Lizzy (Isabela Moner) is the 15-year-old older sister who has protectively looked after her younger siblings Juan (Gustavo Quiroz) and Lita (Julianna Gamiz) while their mother has been incarcerated. She’s a tough cookie with trust issues. Juan is both accident prone and highly sensitive and Lita is super sweet as long as she gets to eat potato chips at every meal. Almost overnight they become an “instant family” and everything g…

This Day in Pop Culture for August 15

(Derek Redmond and Paul Campbell/Wikimedia) 
Woodstock is Held
Though expecting “no more than 50,000 people, about 400,000 people attended the Woodstock Music & Art Fair which began on this day in 1969. After numerous changes in venues, Woodstock finally landed at Max Yasgur's 600 acre dairy farm in Bethel, New York. Local townspoeple were unhappy about the concert and posted “Buy No Milk. Stop Max’s Hippy Music Festival.” Due to recent rains, the grounds were muddy, food supplies where great and the sanitation was poor. Newspaper headlines read, “Hippied Mired in a Sea of Mud.” Despite the conditions, it is reported that the festival was reasonable peaceful, but two deaths occurred (one from a heroin overdose and accident involving a tractor and an attendee sleeping in hay field nearby), two births and four miscarriages. Roy Rogers was asked to sing “Happy Trails” at the end of the festival, but he declined.

(Wikimedia/MGM)
‘The Wizard of Oz’ Premieres in Hollywood
One of America’s most beloved movies, The Wizard of Oz, premiered at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre in Hollywood on this day in 1939. The film opened nationally on August 25, 1939. Despite the popularity of the film today, at the time, the movie initially recorded a loss of $1,145,000 for the studio. MGM, the studio behind the film, did not see a profit on the film until it was re-released in 1949. The film has been recognized by the American Film Institute (AFI) numerous times. Oz has been placed as the #6 best movie of all time, #4 for worst villain, and #1 for best song.


promote my blog BrandBacker Member