FEATURED POST

Enter to Win a ‘Little Women’ Movie Prize Pack

A new re-telling of Little Women comes to theaters on September 28, 2018 and you can win tickets and other goodies from Writer of Pop. ENTER HERE!

Sisters—and dreams—are unique in their ability to inspire, encourage and change the world. For 150 years, Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women has motivated women of all ages to dream together and celebrate family. Coming to theaters for the first time, a modern retelling of Little Women brings a new generation together with their mothers, sisters and friends.
From girls playing in the attic to women living with purpose, the March sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy—are committed to always supporting each other. Yet, growing up sometimes means growing apart. An aspiring writer, Jo leaves for New York determined to publish a novel. In the wake of rejected draft upon draft, her editor challenges Jo to write about something more interesting—her family. When tragedy brings the sisters back home, sticking together takes on new meaning. As Jo comforts he…

This Day in Pop Culture for August 15

(Derek Redmond and Paul Campbell/Wikimedia) 
Woodstock is Held
Though expecting “no more than 50,000 people, about 400,000 people attended the Woodstock Music & Art Fair which began on this day in 1969. After numerous changes in venues, Woodstock finally landed at Max Yasgur's 600 acre dairy farm in Bethel, New York. Local townspoeple were unhappy about the concert and posted “Buy No Milk. Stop Max’s Hippy Music Festival.” Due to recent rains, the grounds were muddy, food supplies where great and the sanitation was poor. Newspaper headlines read, “Hippied Mired in a Sea of Mud.” Despite the conditions, it is reported that the festival was reasonable peaceful, but two deaths occurred (one from a heroin overdose and accident involving a tractor and an attendee sleeping in hay field nearby), two births and four miscarriages. Roy Rogers was asked to sing “Happy Trails” at the end of the festival, but he declined.

(Wikimedia/MGM)
‘The Wizard of Oz’ Premieres in Hollywood
One of America’s most beloved movies, The Wizard of Oz, premiered at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre in Hollywood on this day in 1939. The film opened nationally on August 25, 1939. Despite the popularity of the film today, at the time, the movie initially recorded a loss of $1,145,000 for the studio. MGM, the studio behind the film, did not see a profit on the film until it was re-released in 1949. The film has been recognized by the American Film Institute (AFI) numerous times. Oz has been placed as the #6 best movie of all time, #4 for worst villain, and #1 for best song.


promote my blog