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Shyamalan's 'Glass' is Engaging Almost Until the End

MOVIE REVIEW
I don’t think anyone will deny that M. Night Shyamalan is a great storyteller. He initially proved that with the release of The Sixth Sense. The symbolism of the color red, the odd scenes that made very little sense until the end of the movie and of course, the amazing twist that nobody saw coming. That incredible twist has almost been the director’s undoing. Since 1999, not one of his other movie’s endings have had the same impact, but he continues to try.

In 2000, Mr. Shyamalan hoped that lightening would strike twice with Unbreakable which also starred Bruce Willis. Like The Sixth Sense, Unbreakable was a mystery only this time, the story featured the lone survivor of a train crash who left the accident without a scratch on him and an incredibly fragile, wheelchair-bound, comic book enthusiast which appeared to be the polar opposite. The story was intriguing, but basically fell apart near the end when the twist was revealed. Now almost 19 years later, the same thing ha…

This Day in Pop Culture for June 26

"The Lottery" was published on June 26, 1948.

‘The Lottery’ Ruffles Feathers

The disturbing fictional short story, “The Lottery,” written by Shirley Jackson, was published for the first time in The New Yorker magazine on this day in 1948. It is known as “one of the most famous short stories in the history of American literature” but not necessarily in a favorable sense. The story tells of a small community of 300 or so residents who each year hold a lottery in which one town member gets stoned to death. Both Jackson and The New Yorker were surprised by the negative reaction of readers who cancelled their subscriptions and sent hate mail to the magazine. A month later, Jackson gave an explanation for the story: “Explaining just what I had hoped the story to say is very difficult. I suppose, I hoped, by setting a particularly brutal ancient rite in the present and in my own village to shock the story's readers with a graphic dramatization of the pointless violence and general inhumanity in their own lives.” Ironically, some of the letter were from curious readers who wanted to know where these lotteries were held and if they would be allowed to watch!


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