FEATURED POST

Director Sean Anders Talks About His Own ‘Instant Family’

INTERVIEW
Mark Wahlberg and Rose Byrne’s comedy/drama film, Instant Family appears to be an instant hit with both critics and audiences alike. Sure, not everyone is a fan, but I suspect that people don’t actually have kids themselves. Those that do, appreciate all of the chaos and (at times) the corniness that is a part of family life. In the movie, Wahlberg and Byrne play a couple who want to start a family, but sort of feel that they are a bit old to be just starting and find themselves looking into foster care adoption and end up adopting a teen girl and her two younger siblings. Unrealistic you say? Try telling that to Sean Anders who co-wrote the script and directed the movie. He lived it. Well, mostly.

I met Anders last week to talk about Instant Family just before the film opened and my biggest question for him was how much of this film was actually based on real life. “A lot of it,” he said and then went on telling me a story about how his family came to be.

“First of all, my …

This Day in Pop Culture for April 1

Wrigley Jr. Company was formed on April 1, 1891.

The Wrigley Company is Formed

The William Wrigley Jr. Company was formed on this day in 1891 in Goose Island, Chicago, Illinois and began selling items like soap and baking powder. In what sounds like an April Fool’s joke, Wrigley began including packs of chewing gum with the baking powder. It is no surprise that the gum became more popular and the company began to focus sole only chewing gum. Today, it is still the largest manufacturer of chewing gun in the world. The company’s big three brands were and still are Juicy Fruit (1893), Spearmint (1893) and Doublemint (1914). In 2005, the company bought out Lifesavers and Altoids from Kraft Foods. Then, in 2008, Mars purchased Wrigley.



President Nixon banned cigarette ads on TV on April 1, 1970.

President Nixon Bans Cigarette Ads on TV and Radio

Health studies go back as far as 1939 concluding the cigarette smoking led to higher incidences of cancer and heart disease, but it wasn’t until this day in 1970 that cigarette ads were banned on television and radio. In what must have seemed like an April Fool’s joke to many smokers, President Richard Nixon officially banned cigarette ads despite that fact that he himself was an avid pipe smoker.


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