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Director Sean Anders Talks About His Own ‘Instant Family’

INTERVIEW
Mark Wahlberg and Rose Byrne’s comedy/drama film, Instant Family appears to be an instant hit with both critics and audiences alike. Sure, not everyone is a fan, but I suspect that people don’t actually have kids themselves. Those that do, appreciate all of the chaos and (at times) the corniness that is a part of family life. In the movie, Wahlberg and Byrne play a couple who want to start a family, but sort of feel that they are a bit old to be just starting and find themselves looking into foster care adoption and end up adopting a teen girl and her two younger siblings. Unrealistic you say? Try telling that to Sean Anders who co-wrote the script and directed the movie. He lived it. Well, mostly.

I met Anders last week to talk about Instant Family just before the film opened and my biggest question for him was how much of this film was actually based on real life. “A lot of it,” he said and then went on telling me a story about how his family came to be.

“First of all, my …

This Day in Pop Culture for March 31

Teletubbies debuted on March 31, 1997

Invasion of the Teletubbies

Popular and controversial, the British pre-school TV series, Teletubbies aired for the first time on this day in 1997 and continued to air in the U.K. until 2001. The show was created by Ragdoll Productions and was praised for its high production values, but was criticized for being a show to get toddlers hooked on TV with little educational value. In the U.S., controversy arose about the show in 1999 when the Rev. Jerry Falwell accused the Tinky Winky character of being a gay role model because he was purple, he had an antenna that was shaped like a triangle and carried a purse. Distributors of the show made it clear that the character was not gay and the “purse” was actually a “magic bag.” 60 new episodes of the series were created in 2015.



The Broadway Show "Oklahoma!" Debuted on March 31, 1943.

'Oklahoma!' Was First a Broadway Flop

Much like the bad press that the recent Broadway show, Spiderman: Turn off the Dark received, another show in the 1940’s, Away We Go, also received bad press before it even opened and was considered a “flop in the making.” However, unlike Spiderman which closed January 4, 2014, Away We Go went through a few tweaks, including changing the title to Oklahoma! and ran for 2,212 performances over 15 years. Oklahoma opened on this day in 1943. It was the first project with Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein working together. The show has been revived on and off Broadway numerous times. So much for this flop.


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