FEATURED POST

Director Sean Anders Talks About His Own ‘Instant Family’

INTERVIEW
Mark Wahlberg and Rose Byrne’s comedy/drama film, Instant Family appears to be an instant hit with both critics and audiences alike. Sure, not everyone is a fan, but I suspect that people don’t actually have kids themselves. Those that do, appreciate all of the chaos and (at times) the corniness that is a part of family life. In the movie, Wahlberg and Byrne play a couple who want to start a family, but sort of feel that they are a bit old to be just starting and find themselves looking into foster care adoption and end up adopting a teen girl and her two younger siblings. Unrealistic you say? Try telling that to Sean Anders who co-wrote the script and directed the movie. He lived it. Well, mostly.

I met Anders last week to talk about Instant Family just before the film opened and my biggest question for him was how much of this film was actually based on real life. “A lot of it,” he said and then went on telling me a story about how his family came to be.

“First of all, my …

This Day in Pop Culture for March 27

"Typhoid Mary" Mallon was quarantined for a second time on March 27, 1915.

Something About (Typhoid) Mary

In 1900, Mary Mallon worked as a cook for a family in New York City. Within two weeks, some of the residents there developed typhoid fever. In 1901, she moved to Manhattan to work as a cook for another family where some developed fevers and one died. She then went to work for another family but left after seven of the eight members became ill. In 1906, she worked for a family in Oyster Bay, Long Island where 10 of the 11 household members were hospitalized with typhoid. This continued to happen for three more families before one family hired George Soper, a typhoid researcher, to investigate. (This woman must have had an impeccable resume!) Soper came to the conclusion that many of the illnesses could be traced back to Mallon. When he finally tracked her down (she often left each job without giving a forward address) and told her about her possible role in spreading typhoid. She rejected his requests for samples. The New York City Health Department stepped in and Mallon was then convinced that she was just being persecuted and felt that she hadn’t done anything wrong. She did however admit to poor hygiene and said that she didn’t understand the importance of washing her hands since she “knew” that she didn’t pose a risk for the disease. Doctors were later able to diagnose that Mallon had typhoid bacteria in her gallbladder. As scandalous as the Kardashians are today, Mallon made headlines being referred to as “Typhoid Mary.” After being in quarantine for three years, Mallon was set free as long as she changed her occupation and embraced good hygiene habits. However, after working a lower paying job as a laundress, Mary changed her last name to Brown and returned to cooking. For the next five years the cycle began again. It was on this day in 1915 when Soper finally caught up to her and placed her back in quarantine where she stayed until she died on November 11, 1938 from a bout of pneumonia. Mary was 69 years of age when she died.


The Start of March Madness

The Start of March Madness

The first NCAA men’s basketball tournament finished up on this day in 1939. The University of Oregon beat the Ohio State University 46-33. The Final Four or March Madness has grown considerably since then and not just with fans, but with gamblers too. It is said that by 2005, the sport become the second most popular game among them. (The first was the Super Bowl of course.) At first, only eight teams were invited to participate. Today, 65 teams are broken down into four groups of 16. The winning teams of those groups become the Final Four.


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