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Shyamalan's 'Glass' is Engaging Almost Until the End

MOVIE REVIEW
I don’t think anyone will deny that M. Night Shyamalan is a great storyteller. He initially proved that with the release of The Sixth Sense. The symbolism of the color red, the odd scenes that made very little sense until the end of the movie and of course, the amazing twist that nobody saw coming. That incredible twist has almost been the director’s undoing. Since 1999, not one of his other movie’s endings have had the same impact, but he continues to try.

In 2000, Mr. Shyamalan hoped that lightening would strike twice with Unbreakable which also starred Bruce Willis. Like The Sixth Sense, Unbreakable was a mystery only this time, the story featured the lone survivor of a train crash who left the accident without a scratch on him and an incredibly fragile, wheelchair-bound, comic book enthusiast which appeared to be the polar opposite. The story was intriguing, but basically fell apart near the end when the twist was revealed. Now almost 19 years later, the same thing ha…

This Day in Pop Culture for March 19

March 19 is World Monopoly Day

World Monopoly Day

Though the complete history of who created the game Monopoly and when remain cloudy. Hasbro officially recognizes March 19, 1935 as the game’s anniversary and dubs it World Monopoly Day. Some say that early versions of the game appeared as early as 1903. Numerous editions of the game have been created over the years as well as spin-off games that feature much of the same themes of the original. The game is licensed in 13 countries and printed in 37 different languages. In 2017, it was announced that three new tokens (T-Rex, Penguin and Rubber Ducky) would be added to the game while three others (Wheelbarrow, Thimble and the Boot) would be taken away. Monopoly has also inspired other projects like the summer time TV game show produced by ABC and aired in 1990. Hollywood has been trying to make a feature film based on the game since 2008 and Broadway is currently working on a new musical show based on the game.


The first televised Academy Awards was presented on March 19, 1953.

Bob Hope Emcees the First Televised Academy Awards

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was organized in 1927 and the first Academy Awards were given in May of 1929, but the first televised awards special didn’t come about until this day in 1953. Comedian and actor, Bob Hope served as the master of ceremonies and Fredic March (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and The Best Years of Our Lives) presented the awards at the RKO Pantages Theatre in Hollywood. It was broadcast live on NBC. Hope would host the awards 17 more times during his lifetime with his last in 1977. Thanks for the memories.


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