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The Meg is Closer to ‘Jaws’ Than ‘Sharknado’

MOVIE REVIEW When Steven Spielberg’s Jaws opened in theaters in 1975, it took the world by storm. Not only was the movie hugely popular as it was genuinely scary, it actually affected society in a strange way. Audiences began to have an irrational fear of sharks even when swimming at a lake. When Jaws 2 came to theaters three years later, everyone knew the catchphrase, “Just when you thought it was safe to go back into the water…” Since then, it’s been hard for movie studios to be able to drum up the same excitement with their own Jaws knock-offs. Shark movies became a joke. Even Jaws 3 and Jaws: The Revenge were met with disdain (and with good reason). But sharks are still a popular subject, just not one that we take very seriously anymore.
This brings us to next big shark movie, The Meg which judging from the trailers alone, looks like another campy knock-off movie and while it indeed is campy, it isn’t as much as you would think. When comparing movies, The Meg is closer to Jaws tha…

This Day in Pop Culture for November 5

"The Incredibles" was released in theaters on November 5, 2005.

‘The Incredibles’ Arrive to Save the Day

It was on this day in 2005 when Disney/Pixar released the animated hit movie, The Incredibles. The family of superheroes included Mr. Incredible (who is super strong), Mrs. Incredible (whose maiden name was Elastigirl), daughter Violet (who can become invisible and create protective force-fields), son Dash (who is super fast) and baby Jack Jack (who the family thought had no superpowers, but it turns out, they were wrong.) The family the fights crime together, stays together. The Incredibles was directed by Brad Bird and won the 2004 Annie Award for Best Animated Feature as well as two Oscars. Although fans requested a sequel for years, they will finally get one when The Incredibles 2 arrives in theaters on June 15, 2018.


The Hollywood writers strike began on November 5, 2007.

Hollywood Goes on Strike 

On this day in 2007, film, TV and radio writers went on strike after negotiations break down with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP). Lasting until February 26, 2008, the strike shut down production on more than 60 TV shows. Not surprisingly, the strike is said to have caused a loss of $3 billion to the local Los Angeles economy. TV stations were forced to air reruns over and over again. Some audience even learned how to read a book again.


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