Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Four Spiritual Truths Found in ‘Once Upon a Time’

Four spiritual truths found in ABC's "Once Upon a Time."
"Once Upon a Time" Season Premiere Sunday, September 28, 8:00-9:00 p.m. on ABC
ABC’s Once Upon a Time TV series is not the highest rated, but it has a strong fan base. Why do followers of the show continue to come back to Storybrooke week after week? Well, it might be because of a fondness of fairy tale stories, the incredible sets and costumes or maybe the star power of Ginnifer Goodwin, Jennifer Morrison, Lana Parilla, Josh Dallas, Robert Carlyle and others. But probably it has more to do with the story writing of Edward Kitsis and Adam Horowitz, who also worked their magic for the series Lost in what seems like many years ago.

Kitsis and Horowitz have never been the type to just settle on a story without a deep commitment for character development. Just like Lost, Once characters all have backstories that tend to haunt them throughout the series. It is this attention to character development that makes the show a little more believable in a world of make-believe.

In addition, in every episode of Once, the characters tend to struggle with moral truths, (just like their audience does in real life) and each episode focuses on a message of hope. Whether intentional or not, here are some spiritual insights we can draw from the program:

Have the Faith of a Child
“Assuredly, I say to you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God as a little child will by no means enter it." - Luke 18:17 (NKJV)


The basic premise of Once Upon a Time is that fairytale characters are transported from their home in the Enchanted Forest to the modern small town of Storybrooke because of a course brought on them by the Evil Queen. If Regina can’t have her “happy ending” then nobody else can either. Her stepson, Henry, is a given a story book full of fairytales at the beginning of the series and by himself, realizes that all of the characters in the book are actual residents in his home town. Time and time again, Henry is the voice of reason, but most of the people in his life choose to ignore his insights because they seem too far-fetched to be true.  As Christians, we are instructed to be wise as serpents, but we also need to have faith like a child. Children tend to believe what they are told, but as adults, we are oh so skeptical.